Brief Introduction About Laser Eye Surgery

Many have long wondered what the procedure called laser eye surgery Glasgow is and how and what it does to our vision. Some people have been to unsure of what laser eye surgery or LASIK does to their long-run eye health and so they would just rather wear corrective glasses or contact lenses. There have been negative connotations about it and there have also been positive ones as well. So, to make you informative of the procedure, we wrote down a brief introduction to what laser eye surgery is and what are the benefits as well as the drawbacks.

History
Professor John Marshall first used laser eye surgery in 1991. He patented the use of excimer laser to reshape the cornea. Greek doctor Ioannis Pilakaris and Italian doctor Lucio Burrato found out later on that the healing time from the surgery is much quicker when the laser is applied under a thin flip onto the cornea. In 1995, the US FDA approved the use of lasers for vision correction or LASIK.

Effectiveness
Surveys of patient satisfaction of laser eye surgery ranges from 92 to 98 percent. However, there have been a small number of patients were reported to have been required to undergo a second surgery due to over- or under-correction. A former FDA official Moris Waxler was even reported to say that the failure rate for the procedure could be as much as 50%. However, the FDA denied such statements and calling Waxler’s words as incorrect and false.

Process
A corneal suction ring is placed onto the eye to hold it in place. A flap is then created by cutting through the corneal epithelium. It is then folded back to reveal the middle section of the cornea. The tissue is then vaporized using the excimer laser. The flap is then repositioned over the area where it is held in place by natural adhesion. After the operation, patients are often given antibiotics or eye drops to stop the inflammation.

Risks
Undercorrection
Overcorrection
Temporary only vision correction
Infection induced vision loss
Higher-order aberrations
Irregular astigmatism
Epithelial ingrowth
Dry eyes
Glares

As you can see, a number of risks and complications are associated with the procedure. However, as what we previously wrote, only a very small population has been reported to suffer from the risks stated above. So, before deciding to undergo surgery, make sure you are aware of the procedure and the effects associated with it.