Tips For Scuba Diving In Thailand

Thailand is a tourist hot spot, and deservedly so, with its stunning beaches, and buzzing cities. For those that prefer a more aquatic experience, the Similan and the Surin islands are open for scuba divers looking to enjoy the marine life of the Andaman Sea.

But, of course, you need to be prepared before going scuba diving, as not taking the proper precautions can turn your fun into danger. Before you head out to book on Thailand Liveaboard, you might want to consider some of these tips.

  • Stay protected.
    • If you’re going scuba diving, you need to protect yourself from exposure from the conditions of the water. Thankfully, Thailand’s waters are very moderate; having warm, clear conditions for most of the year. A few professional divers in the region tend to just stick with good beachwear like shorts and a solid shirt, or stick with a 3mm neoprene wetsuit, thanks to the moderate conditions in the region. If you’re looking at multiple dives though, might want to consider a full body wetsuit.
  • Tan, don’t burn.
    • In accordance to the above point, you want to be protected from the sun if you’re going on a Thailand Liveaboard trip. See, Thailand is a tropical country, and while the cool breeze and sea water might make things feel colder than on land, the sun doesn’t care, and will burn you just as bad. Lycra shirts, made of a composite of nylon and spandex, are popular in the region for a reason; they dry fast, they work well against the wind, and they’re pretty good at protecting from the sun, with a protection factor of 50.
  • Stay hydrated.
    • While it might be a little ironic to ask someone diving into water to have a lot of water, it’s actually possible, if uncommon, for people to end up dehydrated diving. Tourists enjoy coffee and tea, which tend to dehydrate, and, when combined with the dry and filtered scuba tank air, leads to people dehydrating during their fun under the sun.
  • Torch it.
    • A small torch (flashlight) is a very useful thing to have when diving. During the day, it’ll let you find aquatic creatures that tend to hide in the nooks and crannies of corals, whilst for night, they’re a necessity. Regardless of the conditions you’re diving in, it can’t hurt to bring an extra light source with you.